The very best way to drive traffic is to find communities, groups and forums online that are interested or related to your niche. You are bound to be able to find some on Facebook or Google or there might be some other specific communities set up. Have a subtle link to your website (don’t try to sell a lot or be spammy) and contribute a lot of value to those groups.
Thanks for sharing these great tips last August! I’ve recently adopted them and I have a question (that’s kind of connected to the last post): how important would promoting content be when using this strategy? For example, through Google Adwords. As I guess that would depend on the circumstances, but I am trying to discover if there’s a ‘formula’ here. Thanks in advance!
What kind of advice would you give is your site is growing but seems to be attracting the wrong kind of traffic? My visitor numbers are going up but all other indicators such as bounce rate, time page, pages per visit seem to be developing in the wrong direction. Not sure if that’s to be expected or if there is something that I should be doing to counter that development?

Great article. My site has been up for several years now but I rebranded and switched from Blogger to WordPress about a year ago because I was told the reason why my traffic is so low is because I was using the wrong platform. I still haven’t seen an increase in my traffic and am very frustrated. I write in the health, fitness and parenting niche and I have over 30 experts that write for me, but I still don’t have the page views I would like. My paychecks are small and I am very frustrated. How do I find out what influencers in my niche are talking about and what they would like to share? I read tons of blogs, but most of them just review products or write about their kids, not a whole lot of similar articles. Where do I begin to find sharable content in my niche?
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Nice post. I was wondering if all this content of your strategy was been writien in blog of the site, or if you added to content in some other specific parts of the sites. I don't believe 100% in the strategy of reomoving links. If Google just penalize you taking into account your inbound likes, It would be so easy to attack your competitors just by buying dirty link packages targeting to their sites.
What do these stats mean? First, these are from a profile I use that broadly groups types of content into single URLs. This site has over one million URLs, and I find most useful to categorize everything into types of pages (you can do this with filtered profiles in GA, which is probably the topic of another post). You can see the Index page of the site is how most people are entering by far. 22% bounce immediately, meaning something about the home page felt completely wrong for whatever those people were looking for. We’ll examine how to improve that number in future posts. You’ll notice a few popular blog posts have much higher bounce rates. These are the “Miss Untargeted” that are coming to your site for one-off content, but are probably not interested in buying whatever you are selling. It is interesting to note that one blog only has a bounce rate of 50%, indicating there is something about that post that invites people to dig further into your site.
The latest research from Google underscores the importance of having a mobile-friendly website. As consumers continue to spend more time on mobile devices, mobile page load speeds are critical to a good user experience. Over 50% of mobile users abandoning sites that take longer than three seconds to load, but most web pages take a lot longer to load, creating a significant gap between consumers' expectations and most businesses' mobile capabilities. 
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